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cicilie

In response to: The Stage is all the World, and the Players are mere Men and Women: Performance Poetry in Postcolonial Paris - What it is, and the questions it answers

cicilie [Member]

Thank you, Aleksandra, and thank you for following me here all these years! You’re absolutely right, it’s the right place to get a greeting from you. I thought I spotted you in the audience on Friday, but afterward I forgot all about it. I have a couple of blog posts in the pipeline, in order finish the story and wrap up the blog, which I think it deserves. Afterward, I’m looking very much forward to get on with some other stuff, academic and other :-)

 Permalink 18/09/12 @ 16:17
Aleksandra

In response to: The Stage is all the World, and the Players are mere Men and Women: Performance Poetry in Postcolonial Paris - What it is, and the questions it answers

Aleksandra [Visitor]

Thinking that the blog is the right place for gratulations! Gratulations, Cicilie! It was fun to attend your defence Friday and fun to follow your Paris-journey. Good luck with new projects, bigger and the tiny ones :)))

 Permalink 17/09/12 @ 21:54
A.

In response to: “Elle va se faire draguer”

A. [Visitor]

If I may add more as to cultural differences, in Norway when you communicate perphaps people value more the content of what people say not the form, and most of times it has to be short, concrete and direct without unuseful “decorations"..while in france and southern europe the form of communication, expressivity is everything! it is even part of communication, so your eyes do communicate, as much as the rest of your facial expressions, bodily postures, gestures, etc. while in norway this is to a much lesser degree so..
But only one question..what if u swap the roles? when men in Norway are called out “hot” by girls on the street noone thinks “oh, that’s a light sexual harassment!", but on the opposite those men are supposed to play along the game, and possibly praise that girl’s sexual emancipation, which is ok, but something doens’t sound so equal there if you swap back the roles…

 Permalink 13/07/11 @ 03:21
Randi

In response to: Pieces into place: Décroissance, another life and another politics – And making sense of the data

Randi [Visitor]

Good to hear that you are having a working-flow at the moment. Wish you good luck.

 Permalink 19/04/11 @ 11:30
Folding bikes

In response to: Sunny Sunday – cycling and les techniques du corps

Folding bikes [Visitor]

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 Permalink 02/04/11 @ 09:22
Alastair

In response to: Ethnography under colonialism: what did Evans-Pritchard think of it all?

Alastair [Visitor]

“A student alerted me to the fact that Evans-Pritchard lead African troops against the Italians in Eastern Africa during the WWII (Wikipedia). After seeing the French film Indigènes (see earlier blog post) on how the French colonial troops were treated during the war, I cannot but wonder how my predecessor treated his own soldiers.”

Presumably one could do some documentary research on this, rather than speculate and imply.

 Permalink 20/02/11 @ 03:15
RandiA

In response to: The multilingual playground

RandiA [Visitor]

Good to see you have time visiting Playgrounds

 Permalink 25/01/11 @ 13:35
cicilie

In response to: Manifesto for faster writing and shorter workdays

cicilie [Member]

That’s a good one, Peterblu. It didn’t take me long in front of the keyboard to remember what an important advice that is. Thank you!

 Permalink 25/01/11 @ 10:30
Peterblu

In response to: Manifesto for faster writing and shorter workdays

Peterblu [Visitor]

Yes, I’ve a simple phrase tacked over my desk to remind me of this “don’t get it right, get it written". Good luck!

 Permalink 24/01/11 @ 16:22
genoffkin

In response to: Manifesto for faster writing and shorter workdays

genoffkin [Visitor]

WOW! 1000 pages a day is impressive hihihi

 Permalink 15/01/11 @ 22:47
cicilie

In response to: Manifesto for faster writing and shorter workdays

cicilie [Member]

Thank you for your comment, Aleksandra! You’re absolutely right about the editing, and 11 days seems like an optimistic and good estimate. Today I’ve done about 600-700 new words and quite a lot of cut’n'paste and now the bulk work for my paper in Catania, Sicily(!!!) is done.

Actually, I do structure a lot along the way, but always with a pencil on paper on in my notebook. That’s why it is so important for me to know exactly what I’m going to work on the next day: I need to have at least an idea, a problematics or a simple outline drawn out beforehand.

Co-authoring I’ve never tried, but I can imagine it must be both creative and confusing the way you do it.

And, finally, no reason do dream of being in my position right now :-) In the beginning of a research project, yes absolutely, but now, when the money and patience is running out, it’s quite nerve-wrecking. But on the other hand, I understand what you mean: When the story finally flows from under your fingers, the feeling is of course absorbing and great. Good luck to you!
best,
Cicilie

 Permalink 11/01/11 @ 14:45
Aleksandra

In response to: Manifesto for faster writing and shorter workdays

Aleksandra [Visitor]

Good for you! This is the way I have been always working. I fill out pages and pages and pages and then the operation starts: cut, move, lim, sew etc. Always worked for me (maybe because I do have problems with finding a structure first, like in painting, you kind of know that it will be a winter landscape, but you are never sure if you’ll end up with 2 trees or 4 etc).

Works for me, but stream of consciousness is a painful method while working on texts with co-authors. I am still not sure how to handle it.

Regarding you question - even if you do 1000 a day, you still will need (I guess) some days/weeks for the operation part. But as you, say it will be much easier to edit. So I would optimistically say 44 days:)
So, cheer up and enjoy the stream and look forward to the lovely structure you’ll see in the end.

Best wishes,
A. (who DREAMS of being in your place - with all its + and - :)

 Permalink 11/01/11 @ 09:51
sortir à lyon

In response to: Fieldwork - a moveable feast?

sortir à lyon [Visitor]

Thanks, I enjoyed that.

 Permalink 03/01/11 @ 15:44
cicilie

In response to: Structuring your presentation

cicilie [Member]

Publikum da vettu

 Permalink 30/08/10 @ 21:43
genoffkin

In response to: Structuring your presentation

genoffkin [Visitor]

fin illustrasjon, må jeg si.

 Permalink 30/08/10 @ 21:42
siirler

In response to: Writing and performance

siirler [Visitor]

performance was very nice thank you letter

 Permalink 15/08/10 @ 15:26
cicilie

In response to: What is it that I’m studying “the making of…”?

cicilie [Member]

Hi Tracy, It’s always good to hear it when others find my musings helpful or interesting. Good luck with the struggle!

 Permalink 07/07/10 @ 19:45
cicilie

In response to: Home Migration and the City: New Narratives, New Methodologies – here I come!

cicilie [Member]

Hi Eileen,
Thanks for your comment! It’s nice to hear from other participants, and I’m looking forward to hearing more about your research at the conference.

 Permalink 07/07/10 @ 19:41
Eileen Hogan

In response to: Home Migration and the City: New Narratives, New Methodologies – here I come!

Eileen Hogan [Visitor]

Hi Cicilie,
I googled ‘Home, Migration and the City…’ and this post popped up. I hope you don’t mind me contacting you, but I’m doing a paper at the conference too - immediately before yours! Mine is on migrant musicians’ narratives of home. Looking forward to meeting you there.
Regards,
Eileen

 Permalink 07/07/10 @ 14:17
cicilie

In response to: What can people learn from your research?

cicilie [Member]

Thanks for your comment, Heather! That’s a really good idea I should consider doing myself. I haven’t been too concerned about trying to be useful before - probably because I didn’t think I could make any difference -, but lately I’ve started thinking that perhaps it’s better to at least try… We’ll see what comes out of it.

 Permalink 24/06/10 @ 19:21
Heather

In response to: What can people learn from your research?

Heather [Visitor]

Every time my supervisor publishes an academic article, she publishes a companion piece for a lay readership - an article in a popular magazine or newspaper, an educational pamphlet distributed through an NGO or other organization, etc. She targets readerships “at home” and abroad.

It’s too bad that this kind of knowledge translation doesn’t get more credit in academic spheres - but for those of us interested in the wider relevance and impact of our work, it’s a worthy undertaking!

 Permalink 24/06/10 @ 14:21
Jessica Baker

In response to: Sunny Sunday – cycling and les techniques du corps

Jessica Baker [Visitor]

Hello,

I’d like to buy an ad on your page:www.antropologi.info/blog/cicilie/2007/sunny_sunday_cycling_and_les_technique_d

The ad would be for a website about triathlon. We will be providing you with the codes.

I don’t have a huge budget, but I’m sure there is a reasonable price we can arrange.

Please get back to me if interested.

Thanks!

Jessica

 Permalink 07/06/10 @ 15:01
Tracey

In response to: What is it that I’m studying “the making of…”?

Tracey [Visitor]

Hi,
I just wanted to say thank you for a post that is interesting and very helpful for me at the moment. I’m finding words very frustrating!

 Permalink 22/05/10 @ 08:38
Aleksandra

In response to: What can people learn from your research?

Aleksandra [Visitor]

Yes, please do that! :)

 Permalink 16/04/10 @ 02:31
Sarah

In response to: Anthropology and fiction (part 1)

Sarah [Visitor]

Interesting post - I’ve not read Knausgård but really enjoyed reading your thoughts on it.
I’m so glad to have discovered your blog ! And I’ll sure to return.

 Permalink 21/02/10 @ 22:10
cicilie

In response to: The long and winding road of a research project

cicilie [Member]

Thanks, Aleksandra! It’s nice to hear that you liked it. I’m thinking about your questions about art now and I’ll write to you soon.

 Permalink 10/02/10 @ 10:52
Aleksandra

In response to: The long and winding road of a research project

Aleksandra [Visitor]

Welcome back! You were missed! I was really touched by your sincerity and genuineness in this post, so I cannot write anything more. Thank you for being so devoted human and anthropologist! All the best and good luck with Ariadne! :)

 Permalink 09/02/10 @ 23:16
Philip Newman

In response to: Sunny Sunday – cycling and les techniques du corps

Philip Newman [Visitor]

Hi Cicilie,
a note from Décines (10 kms from Lyon).

Cycle tracks exist here, but are rarely used - even spurned by the serious sports cyclists who keep to the main road whilst kitted out in local team colours. Those who do use them are predominantly the teenagers to avoid clashes with cars.
But then, once a year, the roads are blocked off for the great social cycle event of the year. Thousands of cyclists then dig out bikes from ’somewhere’in a great display of community action to promote the positive benefits of cycling. Helmets are worn by many; youngsters dash round the course in a wild race; the middle-aged cruise and free-wheel keeping parental eyes on the smaller children. The course is about 10kms and once completed aperitifs are enjoyed as a brass band sounds out its ‘oom-pa-pas’.
Finally, as the slower cyclists trickle in, the first arrivals begin to trickle home. Bikes are then replaced in their ’somewheres’ to wait 356 days for the next sortie and show of community good-will on environmental concerns.
Just an observation after reading your text.

 Permalink 20/12/09 @ 12:34
Term Papers

In response to: Research and ethics: France on Facebook

Term Papers [Visitor]

Such a nice post, it is really interesting, want to admire your work, Thanks.

 Permalink 24/11/09 @ 12:01
Ruby

In response to: Some French slam poetry web sites

Ruby [Visitor]

Hi. Thanks so much for this post. I have been following english spoken word poetry and poetry slams for years, and since beginning a french course in University I have been dying to explore this genre in French as well. Your post has been so helpful in getting me started. All the best

 Permalink 03/11/09 @ 02:50
cicilie

In response to: Some French slam poetry web sites

cicilie [Member]

Thanks for your comment, Marie! It’s interesting to hear from others who also study French slam poetry. There’s probably a lot to say about slam in connection with the banlieues. I’ll see if I can come up with something that can help you. I’ve seen slam, ce qui nous brûle on the internet (dailymotion), but unfortunately it’s removed now.

 Permalink 24/04/09 @ 10:12
marie

In response to: Some French slam poetry web sites

marie [Visitor]

Hello, I am also studying slam, though at a fas lesser level (A2) my project is on it’s connection to the banlieue and I would very much appreciate any viewpoints or information you could share, I’d also suggest you look up the video by pascal tessaurd- the slam that burns, haven’t seen it yet but it’s supposed to be a almost underground docementary about 3 or 4 different slameurs, there motivations etc…hopefully you can get my email address of this. best regards.

 Permalink 23/04/09 @ 15:33
cicilie

In response to: Research and ethics: France on Facebook

cicilie [Member]

Thanks for your comment, Sara! It’s interesting to hear how others deal with this new challenge to research ethics.

 Permalink 14/04/09 @ 19:15
Sara

In response to: Research and ethics: France on Facebook

Sara [Visitor]

Cicilie, I prefer to not use facebook as a tool to get in touch with one’s informants if you want to protect their identities. Yet, you can send them inbox messeges via facebook without adding them telling each one that adding him or her to your friend list might reveal his or her identity which you are protecting. I think at this point they will trust you even more.

 Permalink 14/04/09 @ 04:35
randijaa

In response to: Home office

randijaa [Visitor]

This will work out fine, Cicilie…

 Permalink 05/02/09 @ 20:22
genoffkin

In response to: Cities: It was twenty years ago. Part 2

genoffkin [Visitor]

r

 Permalink 21/01/09 @ 20:41
genoffkin

In response to: Cities: It was twenty years ago. Part 2

genoffkin [Visitor]

A wondeful piece of prose. I shall go and get you a chocolate.

 Permalink 21/01/09 @ 20:39
admin

In response to: …It was twenty years ago: Cities. Part 1

lorenz [Member]

Wow welcome back, Cicilie! Looking forward to the next posts! A good start that roused - at least my - curiosity :)

 Permalink 14/01/09 @ 02:07
Aleksandra

In response to: The question of style, voice and perspective

Aleksandra [Visitor]

Cicilie! I’m so impressed by you being so aware of every step you take and everything you do!! awesome!
all the best to you and yours :):)

 Permalink 01/12/08 @ 01:38
Mary

In response to: One year ago today…

Mary [Visitor]

Hi Cicilie,
I enjoyed reading this post as it very much echoed some of my recent experiences. I left Paris at the end of last September ahd have not been back very much. My field was rather different from yours - most of my informants whether musuem professionals or community heritage workers/activists had similar educational backgrounds to me and spoke in a technical-academic register in which I was also quite comfortable (too comfortable, perhaps).

But I was back in Paris in June for the weekend of the fete de la musique and I recognise your description of the uniqueness of this particular neighbourhood. I ended up in the same bar where I had watched much of the election coverage, with several performers fighting over a single microphone on the pavement to perform a range of (mostly political) songs, some they had written themselves, others by artists like Renaud, and some rap/slam. Almost everyone there knew each other and this was also the case when the next day I went to a neighbourhood festival out in Montreuil.

I find it very hard to put my finger on it but I do feel there is something unique about the broad political culture of north east Paris. Awareness of past struggles that have been fought there - from the Commune to battles over housing and evictions in the 70s and 80s - I think feeds this ‘identity’, although I find the impact of this very hard to measure. The past is certainly very present in the campaigns of people like the RESF, for example. But I sometimes wonder whether this broad leftist consensus also feeds a kind of complacency and/or channels political expression into cultural forms (e.g. slam, street art) rather than political action. I’m not saying the two are mutually exclusive, it’s just a (very unscientific) hunch I have. Maybe because it’s something I see a bit of in London too; an area like Shoreditch thrives on a counter-cultural reputation but the dominant political culture is entirely capitalist-consumerist.

I’m really looking forward to one day reading how you manage to shape all your experiences into words. Good luck with it all!
Mary.

 Permalink 29/07/08 @ 13:51
cicilie

In response to: One year ago today…

cicilie [Member]

What a nice comment, Rakel! Thanks a lot! See you in August, and njoy your holiday in the meantime :)

 Permalink 14/07/08 @ 11:49
cicilie

In response to: Updating

cicilie [Member]

:D Thanks Aleksandra!

 Permalink 14/07/08 @ 11:46
Rakel

In response to: One year ago today…

Rakel [Visitor]

Cicilie! It’s such a pure and inspirational joy to read your blog. You’re writing is a fine mixture of academics and poetry! Hope you are fine. See you soon. :)

 Permalink 13/07/08 @ 14:21
aleksandra

In response to: Updating

aleksandra [Visitor]

gratulerer! :) best wishes!!!!!!! :):)

 Permalink 12/07/08 @ 23:20
cicilie

In response to: Updating

cicilie [Member]

Thanks, Olumide! I know what you mean, but at the same time I think that the fieldwork part of research, at least, has got a lot to do with being a human being, doing things other humans do… Writing up is a different story, unfortunately. I hope everything is going well for you and your work!
best,
Cicilie

 Permalink 04/07/08 @ 10:08
Olumide Abimbola

In response to: Updating

Olumide Abimbola [Visitor]

Hej!

Congratulations on the real life happenings! Sometimes I forget that PhD students are also human beings who do things that other humans do…. Seriously, all the best with your famille.

Olumide.

 Permalink 02/07/08 @ 20:08
cicilie

In response to: The socio-political geography of East Paris: Parisian slam poetry – a space of resistance?

cicilie [Member]

Thanks, Lorenz! Quality and quantity are not necessarily the same thing, you know (even though you usually manage both!). To write something interesting and readable from writing up in an office in Oslo demands far more literary talent and writing skills than to scribble down something from your mundane experiences in the city of romance and revolution :-)

 Permalink 01/07/08 @ 08:28
admin

In response to: The socio-political geography of East Paris: Parisian slam poetry – a space of resistance?

lorenz [Member]

Hi Cicilie! Wow, cool, two posts within 24 hours. Welcome back in the blogosphere. I’m looking forward to reading more from you!

 Permalink 30/06/08 @ 17:15
Aleksandra

In response to: "Start in the middle"

Aleksandra [Visitor]

Start from the core… indeed! at least it worked for me when I started working on my thesis. it’s also much more motivating to start with “the hottest of the hot”:) I think researcher’s journey is interesting for readers, but absolutely boring for himself to write it down from A to Z.
it’s also fun to come back to your startpoint after you have dealt with the core… can be really surprising.
anyway, you who are into art and migration - “Migratory Aesthetics” at Stenersenmuseet maybe something you could like. I have not seen this yet, but sounds interesting and I thought about you when I read about it: http://www.stenersen.museum.no/en/exhibitions.htm

 Permalink 29/03/08 @ 15:45
cicilie

In response to: Yes, my research blog is really supposed to continue…

cicilie [Member]

Hi Mary,
Thanks for the comment. I know very little about publishing in the Anglophone world, but I would be surprised if no one is interested. Maybe in cultural studies journals like Social Text, Cultural Critique, or maybe someone on http://savageminds.org/, http://blogs.nyu.edu/projects/materialworld/ or http://museumanthropology.net/ could give you an advice?

Personally, I’m still in the middle of the process and haven’t thought about publishing anything on blogging. However, I’ve thought a little bit about using my blog as raw material for a book on method. We’ll see, I’ve still got 18 months to go…

 Permalink 17/03/08 @ 14:58